Library
My library

+ Add to library

Contact us
24/7 Tech support | Rules regarding submitting

Send a message

Your tickets

Profile

Lists of frequently asked questions

It defends your Mac from all types of malicious programs—including those created specifically for macOS. With the growing popularity of macOS, malware tends to target specifically this operating system. Incidents involving large-scale botnets comprised of infected Macs did occur: such Trojans as BackDoor.Flashback.39, Trojan.SMSSend and Trojan.Yontoo.1 still pose a threat to unprotected machines.

With Dr.Web for macOS., you can protect your system from these and many other malicious programs created to infect Macs as well as other operating systems. However, bear in mind that, while an update containing a corresponding virus definition has arrived, no anti-virus can protect your Mac against new malware, which hackers tested against latest versions of anti-virus engines. To protect against such malicious programs, you need to use advanced security tools and, of course, be careful when you visit certain sites.

Yes. The first virus for an Apple computer was created in 1982. The first virus for macOS (Mac.Leap) appeared in 2006. In early 2009, the Trojan Mac.Iservice infected machines that comprised the iBot zombie network. In 2012, half a million of computers were connected to the botnet created by the Trojan BackDoor.Flashback. It was Doctor Web who first discovered this zombie network.

An attacker does not necessary need to hack into your computer to install malicious software. In most cases, unwanted programs get onto Macs due to careless of users when they visit legitimate sites, such as news portals. They can be compromised, so that infection gets onto computers of visitors regardless of their OS—in most cases, the target platform is detected and selected automatically.

Two simple conditions must be met for a system to get infected with BackDoor.Flashback.39: Java Virtual Machine must be installed in the system, and a user must load a compromised webpage in the browser.

Trojan.SMSSend family programs can be easily downloaded from various websites under the guise of a useful application. Today, adware for macOS is also rather common. For instance, Trojan.Yontoo.1 gets onto a Mac, if the user agrees to download and install a browser plug-in from certain sites, or downloads it under the guise of a media player, a program to improve video playback quality, a "download accelerator", etc.

There are also e-mail and removable data storage devices—the traditional media that spread malware with no regard to the operating system.

It is a botnet of infected Macs which took shape with emergence of the Trojan Mac.Iservice in January 2009. To date, it has several thousand computers and has managed to manifest itself in a number of DDoS-attacks.

For evaluation purposes, you can use the trial version. Download the distribution from Doctor Web's site at download.drweb.com/demoreq. The period of a demo license is 30 days.

You can also use the free scanner Dr.Web Light for macOS. The scanner incorporates state-of-the-art technologies to detect and eliminate viruses. You can use it to check your system, whenever you need to. However, Dr.Web for macOS is a more feature-packed product as compared with Dr.Web Light for macOS. It includes Dr.Web SpIDer Guard file monitor to scan files in real time.

According to the documentation, OS X 10.7 and above are supported.

Dr.Web for for macOS protects against viruses whose definitions are present in the Dr.Web virus database. They can be written to infect macOS as well as other platforms.

The non-signature detection technology Origins Tracing and heuristic analyser help neutralise threats yet unknown.

Download the program's distribution at download.drweb.com/mac. Install Dr.Web for macOS. In the License Manager, select Demo license.

There is no way to prolong a demo key—you need to purchase a commercial license.

Administrator privileges are required to install Dr.Web. After mounting the drive you will see the following window:

Select Dr.Web anti-virus for macOS. Read the Installation Wizard's welcome and click Continue. To continue the installation, read the License Agreement and accept its terms. After that select the disk onto which Dr.Web for macOS will be installed. Enter the administrator password. Then Dr.Web for macOS will be installed automatically. When finished, click Finish. You don’t need to restart your system after installation.

If you purchased a license for Dr.Web for OS X and the program is already installed on your Mac

  • In the main menu of Dr.Web for macOS, select License Manager. In the subsequent window select Get New License. Follow the registration steps and enter the serial number in the appropriate fields of the registration form. Your key file will be downloaded and placed in the required directory automatically.

If you purchased a license for Dr.Web for macOS and the program is not installed on your Mac

  • Download the installation package at download.drweb.com/mac. During installation, in the License Manager, select Get New License.
  • Enter the serial number in the appropriate fields in the registration form. Your key file will be downloaded and placed in the required directory automatically.

You can also register your serial number at Doctor Web's server at products.drweb.com/register.

You can choose to update the anti-virus automatically and manually on demand or according to the schedule.

Select Update in the program's main window.

By default, only anti-virus file monitor settings are protected. To change them, click on the lock icon in the bottom left corner of the SpIDer Guard window, enter the administrator password and make the necessary adjustments.

Yes, you can. Once a subsequent update is downloaded, you can try to cure a quarantined file.

  1. Find Dr.Web in the Finder. It is usually located in the Applications folder, which can be found on the sidebar of any Finder window. To find the application, you can also use Spotlight (the service icon looks like this: Spotlight). Then double-click on this application in the Spotlight window while holding down the Command button (⌘).
  2. Drag the application to the Trash or select it and choose File > Move to Trash.
  3. When prompted for a user name and password, enter the administrator login and password on the Mac.
  4. To remove the application, choose Finder > Empty Trash.

Click on the spider icon on the menu bar. In the newly appeared Dr.Web window, click on the gear icon.

#drweb

The "Settings" menu will open. Click on "Exclusions".

#drweb

Open the "Websites" tab. Click on the padlock icon to make changes to the Exclusions settings.

#drweb

Enter the administrator login and password. Click on "Unlock".

#drweb

Enter into the list the URLs to which you want to allow access. After entering each URL, you need to click on "Enter".

#drweb

Dr.Web Security Space for Windows supports the use of masks when URLs are specified, but in this case, that capability is absent. Therefore, you should enter site addresses and not segments of their names to the exception list.

  1. Download the utility https://cdn-download.drweb.com/pub/drweb/tools/drweb-sysinfo-macos.zip (the utility is intended for macOS 10.15) and save it to your desktop.
  2. Unpack the application file and run Dr.Web SysInfo.
  3. You will also need to grant the utility full disk-access permissions. When the corresponding alert is displayed, press Grant access. In the Security & Privacy window, click on the padlock icon to make changes to the settings and then tick the box next to Dr.Web SysInfo. In the subsequent prompt select Quit & Restart.

#drweb

  1. Switch back to the Dr.Web SysInfo window and click Generate report.

#drweb

  1. Once you see the message informing you that an archive was created successfully, click on the Show in folder button. The folder containing the report will open. The report file's name will be generated according to this template: id.dwsysinfo.tar.gz.

#drweb

  1. Upload the file to your respective support ticket (Browse → Choose file).

Operating system information:

  • Detailed system information;
  • The complete list of running processes;
  • Information about applications with elevated privileges;
  • The list of applications having full disk-access permissions;
  • All available system logs;
  • Daemon and system process start-up logs;
  • System.log;
  • Updating and software installation logs;
  • System boot/restart time;
  • System component settings.

Information about the installed Dr.Web anti-virus:

  • Dr.Web software component configuration;
  • The Dr.Web anti-virus's logs;
  • Information about the running SysInfo utility.

Back

Nothing found

© Doctor Web
2003 — 2022

Doctor Web is a cybersecurity company focused on threat detection, prevention and response technologies